crowdfunding

Episode 84: Rochester Rising's Spring Sustaining Membership Drive

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This week on the podcast we talk about the Rochester Rising Spring Membership Drive to help make this platform a sustainable part of the Rochester entrepreneurial community. Rochester Rising was launched in July 2016 to fill a real gap in this city and to amplify the stories of our entrepreneurs. Since that time, we’ve told the stories of over 134 unique startups and entrepreneurs to give a face and voice to this city’s entrepreneurial culture. Sustaining memberships help to keep Rochester Rising running and reduce our dependency on advertising and sponsorship. Plus, you get some cool rewards from becoming a sustaining member and know that you’re helping to grow our entrepreneurs, grassroots-style.

Today on the podcast we talk about:

·      The basics of Rochester Rising and what we’ve accomplished in the almost 2 years since the inception of this business.

·      How the crowdfunding campaign Patreon works and what you get for using it.

·      Why you should care.

·      How to become a sustaining member.

 

To become a sustaining member, just click here to get started. Not ready to become a sustaining member? Think about giving a one-time donation to help amplify the stories of our entrepreneurs.

Episode 36: Spring Membership Drive and Favorite Rochester Entrepreneurial Quotes

This week on the podcast we talk about our spring sustaining membership drive, which will move Rochester Rising one step closer to becoming a stable part of the city’s entrepreneurial community. Listen in to learn about the drive and how you can become a champion of Rochester’s homegrown innovators. We also share some of our favorite quotes from Rochester’s entrepreneurs that we’ve collected over the past ten months of Rochester Rising.

Episode 33: MNvest- Investment Crowdfunding for Private Minnesota-based Businesses

This week on the podcast we speak with Zach Robins, a securities attorney and board member of the 501(c)(4) nonprofit, MNvest.org. This nonprofit was launched in 2014 to advocate on behalf of intrastate investment crowdfunding and worked to pass and draft MNvest legislation to democratize investment opportunities for any Minnesotan. MNvest provides privately owned Minnesota businesses the opportunity to raise capital through investment crowdfunding. Currently three funding portals are operational for investment crowdfunding in Minnesota: Venture Near, Silicon Prairie ,and MNstarter. Five investment campaigns are currently being run through these portals

Rochester Rising Episode 9: Details of ArchHacks, a HealthTech, Student Hackathon in St. Louis, with Stephanie Mertz

This week, I got to speak with Stephanie Mertz, a junior at Washington University in St. Louis and co-organizer of ArchHacks, a forty-eight-hour hackathon in St. Louis this November.

  • ArchHacks takes place November 4th through November 6th, from Friday through Sunday.
  • ·Over this weekend, teams of students will build a healthtech-themed, functional prototype by Sunday evening and compete for prizes.
  • The hackathon is exclusively for students, but there are no age restrictions.
  • The application process takes all of ten minutes.
  • For more information, link up with the ArchHacks Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts.
  • Any additional questions can be directed to info@archhacks.io.

“It’s really a unique combination that St. Louis has where we have the expansive medical background, the corporate resources, and startup drive, and the technical talent, all in one area. We thought that here in St. Louis, we were uniquely poised to bring the resources together to enable [a HealthTech themed hackathon].” –Stephanie Mertz

Rochester Rising Episode 7: How to Run a Kickstarter Campaign with Adam Ferrari

This week we got to speak with local community design consultant and architect Adam Ferrari about crowdfunding. Adam launched a Kickstarter campaign in 2012 to fund Charette Happens, a mobile design studio that would serve as a grassroots method to allow people to plan and actively engage in community design.

 

  • Crowdfunding is a way to raise capital online through family, friends, or anyone that stumbles across the campaign to launch a business or a new portion of a business.
  • Adam chose the Kickstarter crowdfunding platform because it is all or nothing. If his idea did not resonate with the community, then it was not worth doing.
  • Adam believes that a strong Kickstarter campaign has a compelling story, offers something new or different, is scalable, and would not happen organically.
  • The biggest thing he did right with Kickstarter was just giving it a chance to fund his idea.
  • His biggest failure was not engaging with the campaign backers and not fully understanding how much work it would take to sustain the Charette Happens truck.

 

“I think a big key is going into [Kickstarter] with the idea that it’s ok if it fails or if it falls on its face. That even if you do get funded, it doesn’t mean it’s a success. That means that you’re given the opportunity for it to succeed.”